Top 10 most beautiful mountains in the world
Top 10 most beautiful mountains in the world

Just like the rest of America, the mountain ranges are diversified and coveted by hikers and mountain climbers from around the globe.

Some people seek to tackle icy cliffs in preparation for bigger, more challenging slopes abroad while others simply bask in the beauty of these natural wonders from their base camps.

Whether you are a beginning hiker or seasoned K-2 climber, these top 10 beautiful mountains in the USA will give you a serious case of wanderlust.

List of top 10 most beautiful mountains in the U.S

10. Mauna Kea, Hawaii

9. Mount Washington, New Hampshire

8. Mount Katahdin, Maine

7. Mount Mitchell, North Carolina

6. Mount Elbert, Colorado

5. Magazine Mountain, Arkansas

4. Mount Whitney, California

3. Denali (Mount McKinley), Alaska

2. Mount Rainier, Washington

1. Grand Teton, Wyoming

The top 10 most beautiful mountains in the U.S

10. Mauna Kea, Hawaii

Photo: Wikipedia
Photo: Wikipedia

Mauna Kea is a dormant volcano on the Big Island of Hawaiʻi that last erupted approximately 4000 years ago. At 13,796 feet above sea level and over 33,000 feet from the bottom of the ocean floor, Mauna Kea is the tallest sea mountain in the world.

Mauna Kea’s summit is home to the world’s largest observatory for optical, infrared and submillimeter astronomy. Research teams from eleven different countries operate 13 telescopes atop Mauna Kea.

In Hawaiian mythology, Mauna Kea is home to the snow goddess Poli‘ahu. In ancient times, the summit was considered the realm of the gods and was kapu (forbidden) to all except the highest chiefs and priests.

Before you make the trek up the mountain, there are a few things you need to know. It’s recommended that children under 16, pregnant women, and those in poor health not go higher than the Onizuka Center for International Astronomy Visitor Information Station (VIS), at 9,200 feet.

9. Mount Washington, New Hampshire

Photo: Wikipedia
Photo: Wikipedia

Mount Washington, called Agiocochook by some Native American tribes, is the highest peak in the Northeastern United States at 6,288.2 ft (1,916.6 m) and the most topographically prominent mountain east of the Mississippi River.

The mountain is notorious for its erratic weather. On the afternoon of April 12, 1934, the Mount Washington Observatory recorded a windspeed of 231 miles per hour (372 km/h) at the summit, the world record from 1934 until 1996. Mount Washington still holds the record for highest measured wind speed not associated with a tornado or tropical cyclone.

The mountain is located in the Presidential Range of the White Mountains, in Coös County, New Hampshire. The mountain slopes lie within the boundaries of several unincorporated townships, with the summit itself lying in the township of Sargent's Purchase. While nearly the whole mountain is in the White Mountain National Forest, an area of 60.3 acres (24.4 ha) surrounding and including the summit is occupied by Mount Washington State Park.

The Mount Washington Cog Railway ascends the western slope of the mountain, and the Mount Washington Auto Road climbs to the summit from the east. The mountain is visited by hikers, and the Appalachian Trail crosses the summit. Other common activities include glider flying, backcountry skiing, and annual cycle and running races such as the Auto Road Bicycle Hillclimb and Road Race.

8. Mount Katahdin, Maine

Photo: The Dyrt
Photo: The Dyrt

Mount Katahdin is the highest mountain in the U.S. state of Maine at 5,269 feet (1,606 m). Named Katahdin, which means "The Greatest Mountain", by the Penobscot Native Americans, it is within Northeast Piscataquis, Piscataquis County, and is the centerpiece of Baxter State Park. It is a steep, tall massif formed from a granite intrusion weathered to the surface. The flora and fauna on the mountain are typical of those found in northern New England.

Katahdin was known to the Native Americans in the region and was known to Europeans at least since 1689. It has inspired hikes, climbs, journal narratives, paintings, and a piano sonata.[4] The area around the peak was protected by Governor Percival Baxter starting in the 1930s. Katahdin is the northern terminus of the Appalachian Trail and is near a stretch known as the Hundred-Mile Wilderness.

In 1967, Mount Katahdin was designated as a National Natural Landmark by the National Park Service.

The mountain is commonly called just "Katahdin", though the official name is "Mount Katahdin" as decided by the US Board on Geographic Names in 1893.

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7. Mount Mitchell, North Carolina

Photo: Wikipedia
Photo: Wikipedia

One of those places that stand apart from the ordinary, Mount Mitchell’s dramatic summit is the highest point east of the Mississippi at 6,684 feet and was the inspiration for one of the nation’s first state parks. From its easily accessible observation deck, the spruce-fir forest of Mount Mitchell State Park leads the eye to unmatched views. A museum explains the mountain’s cultural and natural history, and its trail network allows visitors to explore up close, offering short hikes near the summit and challenging treks leading to adjacent wilderness areas. A nine-site tent campground is open in warm-weather months, and backpacking opportunities abound, including entry onto the Mountains-to-Sea State Trail. A concession area and a full-service restaurant serve visitors from May to October.

6. Mount Elbert, Colorado

Photo: Wikipedia
Photo: Wikipedia

There are five routes that lead to the summit of Colorado's highest mountain. The standard route, via the Northeast Ridge, begins from the North Mt. Elbert Trailhead just outside of Leadville. To reach the trailhead from U.S. 24, turn west onto Colorado 300 and cross the railroad tracks. Drive roughly 0.7 miles and turn left onto Lake County Road 11 towards Halfmoon Creek. After driving 1.2 miles turn right towards the Halfmoon Creek Campground and drive another 5 miles on the dirt road (2WD with washboard and potholes) to the North Mt. Elbert Trailhead. The large parking area on the left side of the road also has restrooms on the premises.

The 14,440-foot mountain is named for Samuel Elbert who served as a territorial governor of Colorado in 1873-1874, and as Colorado State Supreme Court Justice for 12 years. As part of the Hayden Geological Survey, Henry W. Stuckle made the first documented ascent of Mt. Elbert in 1874. Since then the peak has been purportedly climbed by mule, horse, ATV, and even by jeep!

As crazy as it might sound now, there was a movement in the 1970s among some people that felt that 14,428-foot Mt. Massive, Elbert's neighbor to the north, was more deserving of being Colorado's highest mountain. The group apparently embarked on a campaign to stack rocks at the summit in order to raise the height of the mountain. Those that wanted to keep the status quo would periodically visit Mt. Massive and dismantle the over-sized cairn. At some point the pro-Massive group realized their quest was becoming Quixotic, and eventually gave up.

5. Magazine Mountain, Arkansas

Photo: Arkansas State Parks
Photo: Arkansas State Parks

At the peak of the state park experience is Mount Magazine, Arkansas’s highest point at 2,753 feet. People come for the sweeping views alone, but there is much to see and do from this unique spot. Mount Magazine State Park is a place of relaxation, exploration, nature study, and is within the Ozark-St. Francis National Forests. It is a destination for outdoor sports and extreme adventures with mountain biking, horseback riding, backpacking, and ATV riding. Mount Magazine is the state park system’s most dramatic location for technical rock climbing, and it’s one of only two parks to offer hang gliding launch areas. Scenic overlooks, hiking trails, picnic area, pavilion, and visitor center with gift shop add to the amenities. A wide variety of programs led by park interpreters highlights the mountain’s natural diversity.

The Lodge at Mount Magazine features 60 guest rooms, Skycrest Restaurant, a conference center, business center, heated indoor swimming pool, fitness center, and game room. From its setting on the mountain’s south bluff, the lodge offers breathtaking views of the Petit Jean River Valley and Blue Mountain Lake in the distance. Its beautiful setting and first-class facilities make the lodge a top choice for romantic getaways, weddings, conferences, and corporate retreats. The conference space can be divided into three meeting rooms or opened up for banquet-style seating for up to 192 people. Skycrest Restaurant seats up to 125.

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4. Mount Whitney, California

Photo: La Jolla Light
Photo: La Jolla Light

Mount Whitney (Paiute: Too-man-i-goo-yah) is the highest mountain in the contiguous United States and the Sierra Nevada, with an elevation of 14,505 feet (4,421 m). It is in East–Central California, on the boundary between California's Inyo and Tulare counties, 84.6 miles (136.2 km) west-northwest of North America's lowest point, Badwater Basin in Death Valley National Park, at 282 ft (86 m) below sea level. The mountain's west slope is in Sequoia National Park and the summit is the southern terminus of the John Muir Trail, which runs 211.9 mi (341.0 km) from Happy Isles in Yosemite Valley. The eastern slopes are in Inyo National Forest in Inyo County.

3. Denali (Mount McKinley), Alaska

Photo: Wikipedia
Photo: Wikipedia

Denali ( also known as Mount McKinley, its former official name) is the highest mountain peak in North America, with a summit elevation of 20,310 feet (6,190 m) above sea level. With a topographic prominence of 20,194 feet (6,155 m) and a topographic isolation of 4,621.1 miles (7,436.9 km), Denali is the third most prominent and third most isolated peak on Earth, after Mount Everest and Aconcagua. Located in the Alaska Range in the interior of the U.S. state of Alaska, Denali is the centerpiece of Denali National Park and Preserve.

The Koyukon people who inhabit the area around the mountain have referred to the peak as "Denali" for centuries. In 1896, a gold prospector named it "Mount McKinley" in support of then-presidential candidate William McKinley; that name was the official name recognized by the federal government of the United States from 1917 until 2015. In August 2015, 40 years after Alaska had done so, the United States Department of the Interior announced the change of the official name of the mountain to Denali.

2. Mount Rainier, Washington

Photo: Wikipedia
Photo: Wikipedia

Ascending to 14,410 feet above sea level, Mount Rainier stands as an icon in the Washington landscape. An active volcano, Mount Rainier is the most glaciated peak in the contiguous U.S.A., spawning five major rivers. Subalpine wildflower meadows ring the icy volcano while ancient forest cloaks Mount Rainier’s lower slopes. Wildlife abounds in the park’s ecosystems. A lifetime of discovery awaits.

Weather patterns at Mount Rainier are strongly influenced by the Pacific Ocean, elevation, and latitude. The climate is generally cool and rainy, with summer highs in the 60s and 70s. While July and August are the sunniest months of the year, rain is possible any day, and very likely in spring, fall, and winter.

Visitors should be aware that mountain weather is very changeable. Wet, cold weather can occur anytime of the year. Although late-July and August are generally the driest and warmest time of the year, summer can also be wet and cool. Snow will remain at the 5,000 to 8,000 feet elevation well into mid-July.

1. Grand Teton, Wyoming

Photo: Shutterstock
Photo: Shutterstock

Grand Teton National Park is an American national park in northwestern Wyoming. At approximately 310,000 acres (480 sq mi; 130,000 ha; 1,300 km2), the park includes the major peaks of the 40-mile-long (64 km) Teton Range as well as most of the northern sections of the valley known as Jackson Hole. Grand Teton National Park is only 10 miles (16 km) south of Yellowstone National Park, to which it is connected by the National Park Service–managed John D. Rockefeller Jr. Memorial Parkway. Along with surrounding national forests, these three protected areas constitute the almost 18,000,000-acre (7,300,000 ha) Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, one of the world's largest intact mid-latitude temperate ecosystems.

The human history of the Grand Teton region dates back at least 11,000 years, when the first nomadic hunter-gatherer Paleo-Indians began migrating into the region during warmer months pursuing food and supplies. In the early 19th century, the first white explorers encountered the eastern Shoshone natives. Between 1810 and 1840, the region attracted fur trading companies that vied for control of the lucrative beaver pelt trade. U.S. Government expeditions to the region commenced in the mid-19th century as an offshoot of exploration in Yellowstone, with the first permanent white settlers in Jackson Hole arriving in the 1880s.

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