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What Is National Anthem Of Brazil: History, Lyrics In Portuguese and English, Why Shortened At World Cup. Photo Babbel

When was Brazil’s national anthem composed?

‘The Brazilian National Anthem’ (‘Hino Nacional Brasileiro’) was first introduced to the public in the 1830s. Over the years there has been numerous changes until September 6, 1922, when the version we hear today was officially adopted. Brazilians describe the national anthem as warm, joyful and bringing a sense of energy to the nation.

Who composed Brazil’s national anthem?

The melody was first composed by Francisco Manuel da Silva in 1831 but today’s lyrics were written in 1922 by Joaquim Osorio Duque Estrada. Prior to 1922 the hymn was known as “April 7 Hymn” and the words marked the abdication of Pedro I and the succession of Pedro II as Emperor of Brazil at just five years old.

Perhaps it’s because the national anthem was written by a poet, that’s why many Brazilians claim that the words to this beautiful song are not a walk in the park to comprehend. The main aspect of the Brazilian National Anthem is that the singer declares his or her love for Brazil and its citizens. The citizens are described as free children living on a giant motherland.

Being little disseminated, the composition would only be remembered in April 1831, when Brazilian people celebrated Pedro I’s abdication. With lyrics by Ovídio Saraiva, the composition has been later on referred as the “Anthem of April 7th”.

Ten years later, well orchestrated, the anthem would be played at Emperor Pedro II's coronation festivities, under the title “Coronation Anthem”. So, although not yet formalized, but already consecrated by tradition as Brazilian National Anthem, it was in 1869 the theme of a masterful piece, the “Fantasy on the Brazilian Anthem”, composed and played in a soirée in the Imperial Palace by the celebrated American composer and pianist Louis Moreau Gottschalk.

In 1889, by the occasion the Republic was installed in Brazil, the most radical citizens wished for a new national anthem, considering the old one an heirloom of the Empire. A contest took place in January 1890 to choose the new anthem, attended by 29 composers. Many people and politicians pleaded fort the maintenance of the olf anthem and Brazilian President Deodoro da Fonseca decided soon enough that the new anthem would be the “Proclamation of the Republic Anthem”.

After the contest, the law nº 171 signed on January, 20st, 1890 maintained the work by Francisco Manuel da Silva as the “National Anthem”, as well as declared the composition rewarded with the first prize, by Leopoldo Miguez and José Joaquim Medeiros e Albuquerque, as the “Proclamation of the Republic Anthem”.

Photo aboutBrasil
Photo aboutBrasil

Nevertheless, the old lyrics didn’t suit the new political status as a Republic. This situation would remain disregarded until July 1909, when the government instituted a new contest to choose the new lyrics. Joaquim Osório Duque Estrada’s (1870/1927) poem won the contest, but would still await several years to be officially declared the text of the “Brazilian National Anthem”, by the law n°15.671, of June, 9, 1922, the day before the Independence Centennial and 99 years after the composition’s creation. Francisco Manuel died five years before the birth of his partner Osório Duque Estrada.

The musical style of the Brazilian national anthem is similar to early Italian Romantic music, comparable to composers such as Gioachino Rossini.

Before the National Anthem came to be, there was an Independence Anthem. It was composed by emperor Pedro I and was used until he was removed in power in 1831. The ironic thing was, it was first sung six days after he was removed from power, sort of like a farewell song. The lyrics to this Independence Anthem even included words describing Portuguese imperialists as monsters.

READ MORE: Top 23 Facts about Brazils You (Probably) Didn't Know

Why do they not sing the full anthem at international sporting events like the World Cup and Olympics?

Photo classicfm
Photo classicfm

The Brazilian national anthem contains two stanzas but in most sporting events, like the World Cup, only the first is sung. Partly due to its length, it is also shortened because the players are not formally singing the anthem in front of a microphone. The Brazilian law specifies that only one chorus can be sung in instrumental performances.

Portuguese Lyrics of Brazil’s National Anthem

Verse One:

Ouviram do Ipiranga as margens plácidas /

De um povo heroico o brado retumbante, /

E o sol da Liberdade, em raios fúlgidos, /

Brilhou no céu da Pátria nesse instante. /

Se o penhor dessa igualdade /

Conseguimos conquistar com braço forte, /

Em teu seio, ó Liberdade, /

Desafia o nosso peito a própria morte! /

Ó Pátria amada, /

Idolatrada, /

Salve! Salve! /

Brasil, um sonho intenso, um raio vívido, /

De amor e de esperança à terra desce, /

Se em teu formoso céu, risonho e límpido, /

A imagem do Cruzeiro resplandece. /

Gigante pela própria natureza, /

És belo, és forte, impávido colosso, /

E o teu futuro espelha essa grandeza. /

Terra adorada /

Entre outras mil /

És tu, Brasil, /

Ó Pátria amada! /

Dos filhos deste solo /

És mãe gentil, /

Pátria amada, /

Brasil!

Verse Two:

Deitado eternamente em berço esplêndido, /

Ao som do mar e à luz do céu profundo, /

Fulguras, ó Brasil, florão da América, /

Iluminado ao sol do Novo Mundo! /

Do que a terra mais garrida /

Teus risonhos, lindos campos têm mais flores, /

"Nossos bosques têm mais vida", /

"Nossa vida" no teu seio "mais amores". (*) /

Ó Pátria amada, /

Idolatrada, /

Salve! Salve! /

Brasil, de amor eterno seja símbolo /

O lábaro que ostentas estrelado, /

E diga o verde-louro dessa flâmula /

― Paz no futuro e glória no passado. /

Mas se ergues da justiça a clava forte, /

Verás que um filho teu não foge à luta, /

Nem teme, quem te adora, a própria morte. /

Terra adorada /

Entre outras mil /

És tu, Brasil, /

Ó Pátria amada! /

Dos filhos deste solo /

És mãe gentil, /

Pátria amada, /

Brasil!

Lyrics in English

The peaceful banks of the Ipiranga

Heard the resounding cry of an heroic people,

And the dazzling rays of the sun of Liberty

Bathed our country in their brilliant light.

If with strong arm we have succeeded

In winning a pledge of equality,

In thy bosom, O Liberty,

Our hearts will defy death itself!

O adored Fatherland,

Cherished and revered,

All hail! All Hail!

Brazil, a dream sublime, vivid ray of love and hope to earth descends,

Where in your clear, pure, beauteous skies

The image of the Southern Cross shines forth.

O country vast by nature,

Fair and strong, brave and colossus,

Thy future mirrors this thy greatness.

O land adored

Above all others,

‘Tis thee Brazil,

Beloved Fatherland!

Thou art the gentle mother of the children of this soil,

Beloved land,

Brazil!

Laid out eternally in the splendour of nature,

In the sound of the sea and the light of heaven,

may thou shine, O Brazil, flower of America,

Illumined by the sun of the New World!

More flowers put forth in thy fair, smiling fields

Than the in the most gorgeously reputed lands;

“More life is to be found in the groves”,

“More love in our lives” in thy embrace.

O adored Fatherland,

Cherished and revered,

All Hail!

All Hail!

May the star-scattered banner flown by thee,

Brazil, become the symbol of eternal love,

And may the green-gold flag proclaim always

– Peace in the future and glory in the past –

But if the mighty sword of justice drawn forth,

You will perceive your children, who adore you,

neither fear to fight,

nor flee from death itself.

O land adored

Above all others,

‘Tis thee Brazil,

Beloved Fatherland!

Thou art the gentle mother of the children of this soil,

Beloved land,

Brazil!

Brazil Flag: Symbol of Order & Progress

Photo lonely planet
Photo lonely planet

The flag of Brazil is green with a large yellow diamond in the center. Inside the diamond is a blue circle (globe) with white stars of five different sizes and a white strip. In this white strip is the slogan written in green: Ordem e Progresso ('Order and Progress'). The Brazil flag is sometimes called Auriverde, Portuguese for '(of) Gold and Green'.

The colours and design of the Brazil flag are derived from the flag of the Brazilian Empire; the imperial symbol was replaced by a blue globe with stars and the motto. The current flag of Brazil was officially adopted on 19 November 1889, four days after Brazil became a republic. A few small changes have been made since that time, most recently on 11 May 1992 when 4 stars were added.

Colours

Each colour of the Brazil flag has a symbolic meaning. The yellow represents the wealth of the Brazilian soil, including the gold reserve. The green symbolizes the flora and fauna, particularly the Amazon rainforest, the jungle along the Atlantic Ocean and the Pantanal.

By the way, these colors had a different symbolic meaning in the flag of the Brazilian Empire. The blue and white colors stand for the Virgin Mary, symbolizing the Catholic nature of the Brazilian society.

Slogan

The slogan 'Ordem e Progresso' is the best known motto of Positivism. It is mentioned in a quote of philosopher Auguste Comte: "L'amour et l'ordre pour principle pour base; pour le progrès but" ("Love as a principle and order as the basis; progress the goal").

'Order and Progress' was the justifying principle for many oligarchic and authoritarian regimes in Latin America between 1870 and 1930. They conceded that democracy is a better form of government, but for a democracy to function properly, the population had to be educated and economic and material progress should be made first.

Firmament

The stars on the Brazil flag make up the Southern Cross - symbolic constellation of the southern hemisphere - and some constellations around it. The flag shows the stars (constellations) as seen from Rio de Janeiro on the morning of 15 November 1889, the day the Brazilian Empire was replaced by a republic.

Years after the proclamation of the republic, it was decided that the stars would represent the states, as in the flag of the United States. Then the flag was modified slightly to 21 stars. Each star represents a state since then. The Federal District has its 'own' star: Sigma Octantis, a star which is located close to the celestial south pole, which is visible year-round in almost the entire country.

At times when Brazil got more states by splitting larger states, the flag of Brazil was changed by adding a star. The last change took place in 1992, since then the Brazilian flag shows the current number of 27 stars.

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