10 Least Popular Places in Australia That You Don't Want to Visit
Top 10 Least Popular Places in Australia That People Don't Want to Visit

There are endless rankings we found to prepare to visit Australia: whether they are the best places to live, the best places to do business, or how much fun they are. Such judgments are made by economists, companies, and journalists – but do you want some things new and different?

Check out our list of top 10 least popular places in Australia people do not want to visit below!

List of Top 10 Least Popular Places in Australia You don't Want to Travel

#1. Heart Reef

#2. Cartier Island

#3. Heard Island

#4. Tin Can Bay

#5. South Coast, Point Nepean National Park

#6. Umpherston Sinkhole

#7. Lake Bumbunga

#8. Coral Bay

#9. The Ranger Retention Pond

#10. Devils Marbles

*****

What Are The Least Popular Destinations in Australia?

#1. Heart Reef

10 Least Popular Places in Australia That You Don't Want to Visit
Photo: Traveller Australia

Heart Reef was discovered in 1975 by a local pilot and is now an internationally-recognized attraction of The Whitsundays. This incredible coral formation features many postcards and brochures promoting The Whitsundays and the Great Barrier Reef.

It has featured in dozens of tourism marketing campaigns, but you can't go there! In a piece of beautiful irony, the star of about 7,283,030 tourism marketing campaigns is one of the places in Australia no one can actually get to. Heart Reef in the Whitsundays – that island from all the promotional films that looks like a heart from above – has protected status. That means you can't land a helicopter on it, sail up to it, or snorkel by it.

Of course, this would be largely pointless anyway – it doesn't look so romantic from ground level. Air Whitsunday (www.airwhitsunday.com.au) operates a range of scenic flight that give a bird's eye (and brochure photographer's) view of Heart Reef.

#2. Cartier Island

10 Least Popular Places in Australia That You Don't Want to Visit
Photo: TN Horse Trails

Lying closer to Indonesia than Australia, where the Indian Ocean meets the Timor Sea, Cartier Island is a 0.4-hectare sand cay sticking out from a reef.

It's lumped in with the also uninhabited Ashmore Islands 70km away and administered by the Department of Transport and Regional Services – which should give an idea of just how important it is. The 172 square kilometer marine reserve surrounding the ocean speck is rather more important, however. Around 16 percent of Australia's fish species can be found there.

You're only going to get into that reserve if you're an Indonesian fisherman with a special licence or an Australian government official monitoring said Indonesian fishermen from a patrol boat.

#3. Heard Island

10 Least Popular Places in Australia That You Don't Want to Visit
Photo: CRISOscope

Even if you could get to Australia's most remote island, chances are you still wouldn't quite see it. The little-known landmass, Heard Island, hides in the dense clouds for around 360 days a year.

The rare few who do reach this distant wonder are more likely to hear the gurgle of molten rock bubbling up through the island's violent core. The active volcano on Heard Island, known as Big Ben, is adorned with vast glaciers stretching to the crashing waves of the ocean far below.

At a soaring 2,745 meters, it is 517m taller than Mount Kosciuszko, giving it the little-known title of the tallest mountain in Australian-owned territory excluding Antarctica. Heard Island takes seven days to reach by boat from Fremantle. The 4,000-kilometre journey over rough and stormy seas is usually undertaken only by fishermen and the occasional research scientist.

If you really, really want to go there to see the penguins, glaciers, seabirds, and lava flows, it's a complex process. First, you need permission from the Australian Antarctic Division. Then you need to persuade the crew of a properly kitted-out expedition boat to sail for up to two weeks across some of the roughest seas on earth. Let's just say it's unlikely.

#4. Tin Can Bay

10 Least Popular Places in Australia That You Don't Want to Visit
Photo: RealEstate

Tin Can Bay is a beautiful seaside village that is known for its abundant wildlife, easy atmosphere, and magnificent wild-catch seafood harvested from the pristine waters of the Great Sandy Strait (Great Sandy Marine Park) and Pacific Ocean.

With miles and miles of pristine waterways, the most rewarding activity is being on the water and you can even sleep on the Sandy Strait via Tin Can Bay Houseboats or Tin Can Bay's Sleepy Lagoon Motel offers an affordable option if you prefer staying on dry land. As the closest southern gateway to K’gari Fraser Island, it has more than 140 species of birdlife choosing to call this place home making it a great spot for a bit of birding.

This seaside village is tiny but has one thing that people come back for. The humpback Dolphin. Travelers and locals get a unique opportunity to hand feed and interact with these rare dolphins. It’s done with great care as they are a protected species. You can also enjoy the wonderful beaches, campsites and terrific seafood. You can also rent houseboats, take a beach drive or visit one of the lively markets. You’ll be surprised about the number of backpackers that haven’t heard of this place. Don’t be one of those people

#5. South Coast, Point Nepean National Park

10 Least Popular Places in Australia That You Don't Want to Visit
Photo: TripAdvisor

Point Nepean – the tip of the Mornington Peninsula that hugs the eastern side of Port Philip Bay – hasn't always been a national park. Visitors are still restricted from entering large swathes of the area, and those parts tend to coincide with the parts that were used as a military firing range for many years. There's a twin reason for keeping these large patches fenced off – one is conservation, and the other is unexploded ordnance. Go walking where you shouldn't and there's an unnervingly high chance of losing a limb or two.

Boat access along the south coast of this area is prohibited for safety reasons too – rough seas and high cliffs make it too dangerous to land anywhere.

#6. Umpherston Sinkhole

10 Least Popular Places in Australia That You Don't Want to Visit
Photo: Ellalist

The Umpherston Sinkhole (or the Sunken Garden) is one of the most spectacular gardens located in the Mount Gambier region. Umpherston sinkhole was once a typical limestone cave that formed by the corrosion of limestone rocks by seawater waves and the sinkhole was naturally created when the chamber’s roof collapsed.

Presently, the Umpherston Sinkhole is a beautiful sunken garden that offers a perfect setting for visitors to enjoy and spend some time. The Umpherston Sinkhole was made into a garden by James Umpherston in 1886. The sinkhole is open from dawn to dusk and, as the sun sets, the Umpherston Sinkhole comes alive with hundreds of possums as they come into this tranquil garden to feed. The sculptures at Umpherston Sinkhole are inspired by the geological processes of the region that resulted in the formation of sinkholes.

This spectacular natural sinkhole is something that reminds us of a scene from Avatar. The Umpherston sinkhole as once a normal limestone cave located at Mount Gambier, that was formed by the corrosion by seawater waves. The sinkhole was naturally created when the chamber’s roof collapsed. It’s now home to a beautiful garden that you can visit.

#7. Lake Bumbunga

10 Least Popular Places in Australia That You Don't Want to Visit
Photo: Traveller Australia

Less than two hours’ drive from Adelaide, Lake Bumbunga’s bubble gum shores draw an eclectic crowd from casual photographers to high-end fashion brands. Located in Lochiel, the lake is known to change color from pink to white, to blue, depending on the salinity of the water throughout the year.

Head east from Lake Bumbunga and you’ll find yourself in the famed Clare Valley wine region where you can quench your thirst with color-coordinated rosé from Mr. Mick, Kilikanoon, or Jim Barry.

However, this lake is used to extract salt from and turns pink during some seasons. It’s located in an area that is lesser-known in Australia so you could say that this Instagramable pink lake deserves a spot on our list!

#8. Coral Bay

10 Least Popular Places in Australia That You Don't Want to Visit
Photo: iStock

Coral Bay is a marine-lovers paradise and one of Western Australia's premier family holiday destinations. Named Coral Bay due to the beautiful coral gardens which lie mere meters from the pristine white sandy beach, this tiny, laidback seaside location is a must-visit destination for nature lovers.

It’s a special spot because it’s full of marine life. Whale sharks come to the area between March and June and from June to October you can watch the migration of the Humpback Whales. It’s not a town full of restaurants and café’s so you should go here to unwind and enjoy the stunning nature.

#9. The Ranger Retention Pond

10 Least Popular Places in Australia That You Don't Want to Visit
Photo: Global Arbitration Review

An absolute shoo-in for the title of Australia's least appealing swim, this large billabong on the cusp of Kakadu National Park is one you can't dip a toe into anyway. That's probably a good thing – even though the local wildlife seems to be treating it as an idyllic wetland refuge.

To protect from possible contamination, by law, all water that falls on the Ranger Uranium Mine site has to be kept there. And during the wet season, that's a hell of a lot of water.

It's not just potential radiation that's the issue, however – traps by the side of the pond indicate that saltwater crocodiles have taken up residence in there. Prime snorkelling territory it is not. For a safe swim within Kakadu, head to the top of Gunlom Falls – the natural infinity pool there is too high up for the crocs to get at.

#10. Devils Marbles

10 Least Popular Places in Australia That You Don't Want to Visit
Photo: Westend61

The name is already cool enough to check these babies out! If you go to the Northern Territory you probably visit Uluru and Alice Springs but most people forget about the Devils Marbles. The round stone balls are a special sight and of spiritual significance to the traditional Aboriginals. The rocks are million of years old and due to erosion they have turned into giant boulders. It’s possible to camp on site and enjoy the unusual shapes at sunrise.

One traditional story that has been told refers to how the Devils Marbles were made. 'Arrange' was an ancient ancestor who made a hair belt, which is a traditional accessory only worn by initiated Aboriginal men. When he twirled the hair to make the belt, clusters were dropped on the ground, which became the boulders.

Read More: Top 10 Least Popular States That You Don't Want to Visit in the USA

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