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What Is National Anthem Of Argentina: History And Shorter Version of Lyrics. Photo Amazon

What is national anthem of Argentina?

The ‘Argentine National Athem’ (or ‘Himno Nacional Argentino’, as it’s known to its citizens), was composed by the Spanish musician Blas Parera, with lyrics by Vicente López y Planes.

After watching a play about the 1810 revolution against Spain, Vicente Lopez was inspired to write an anthem for his country. Lopez called his song the "Anthem of May" and originally wrote nine verses.

The anthem underwent many modifications to tone down the militaristic and anti-Spanish nature of the song before the government chose to adopt the first and last verses on May 11, 1813 (the third anniversary of the revolution).

The government initially named the anthem the "Marcha Patriotica" and it was later known as the "Cancion Patriotica Nacional. Today it is the "Himno Nacional Argentino."

The work, which is largely dominated by the theme of independence, was officially adopted as the country’s national anthem on 11 May 1813 (the day which is now named ‘Anthem Day’ in Argentina).

But in 1900, a decree declared the anthem should be shortened to include only the first verse, last verse and chorus of the original version, omitting several verses which spoke of Argentina’s struggle for independence from Spain.

Why was there another national anthem before?

The first anthem of Argentina, known as the ‘Patriotic March’, was written by Esteban de Luca and Blas Parera and published in 1810. It made no reference to Argentina, talking instead about Spain being conquered by France in the Peninsular War.

Two years later, a new anthem was commissioned and written by Cayetano Rodriguez and – you guessed it – our old friend Blas Parera. But the pair didn’t want their song to become an anthem.

So, in 1813, a call for lyrics to a new anthem was put out. A poem by a lawyer called Vicente Lopez y Planes was selected, and Parera was once again chosen to compose the music for the anthem we hear at games today.

The shorter version is the one we hear sung today.

Why is the Argentina national anthem shortened at the World Cup, and what is it called?

Photo Getty
Photo Getty

The first Argentinian anthem was composed as early as 1810, before it was adopted as the official song three years later following the Revolution.

Its lyrics were written by the Buenos Aires-born Vicente Lopez y Planes, whilst the music was composed by a Spaniard, Blas Parera.

There is a long, anti-Spain section in the middle of the piece which has been omitted since 1924 - and the whole piece is extremely long.

As a result, in the Olympics, rugby games and at the World Cup, only the instrumental introduction (which lasts 1 minute 6 seconds) is played.

What is it called?

The anthem is simply known as the Himno Nacional Argentino.

It had previous names that translated as the Marcha Patriotica (Patriotic March) or Cancion Patriotica Nacional (National Patriotic Song).

Lyrics of Argentina’s National Anthem

First Part.

Oid, mortales el grito sagrado

libertad, libertad, libertad

Oid el ruido de rotas cadenas,

que responde a la noble igualdad.

Ya su trono dignisimo abrieron,

Ya su trono dignisimo abrieron,

las Provincias Unidas del sur,

las Provincias Unidas del sur,

y los libres del mundo responden

al gran Pueblo Argentino, Salud

al gran Pueblo Argentino, Salud !

Y los libres del mundo responden:

Al gran Pueblo Argentino, Salud !

Second Part

Sean eternos los laureles

que supimos conseguir,

que supimos conseguir !

Coronados de gloria vivamos

Oh, oh, juremos con gloria morir

Oh, juremos con gloria morir,

Oh, juremos con gloria morir !!

English Translation - Argentina’s National Anthem

Mortals! Hear the sacred cry;

Freedom! Freedom! Freedom!

Hear the noise of broken chains.

See noble Equality enthroned.

The United Provinces of the South

Have now displayed their worthy throne.

And the free peoples of the world reply;

We salute the great people of Argentina!

(repeat)

And the free peoples of the world reply;

We salute the great people of Argentina!

(repeat previous two lines)

CHORUS

May the laurels be eternal

That we knew how to win.

Let us live crowned with glory,

Or swear to die gloriously.

(repeat three times)

Shorter Version

Hear, mortals, the sacred cry:

"Freedom! Freedom! Freedom!"

Hear the sound of broken chains

See noble equality enthroned.

Their most worthy throne have now opened

The United Provinces of the South.

And the free people of the world reply:

"To the great Argentine people, good health!"

"To the great Argentine people, good health!"

And the free ones of the world reply:

"To the great Argentine people, good health!"

And the free ones of the world reply:

"To the great Argentine people, good health!"

Argentina Flag

Photo classicFM
Photo classicFM

This flag was adopted on February 12, 1812, four years after Argentina achieved independence from Spain (1816). The "Sun of May" design was added to the flag in 1818. The blue and white colors were chosen by Manuel Belgrano, the leader of the Argentinian revolution against Spain.

Flag Date of Adoption: February 12, 1812

Flag Symbolism: Three equal horizontal bands of light blue (top), white, and light blue; centered in the white band is a radiant yellow sun with a human face known as the Sun of May.

It's width-to-length ratio varies: proportions of 1 to 2 and of 9 to 14 are commonly used on land, while the ratio 2 to 3 is used at sea.

The colors may represent the clear skies and snow of the Andes. However, research indicates that the colors were already in use as ribbons and cockades to denote an individual's political leanings and may have originally come from the House of Bourbon.

The sun symbol is a replica from the first Argentine coin. It is said to commemorate the appearance of the sun breaking through cloudy skies on 25 May 1810, at the beginning of the first mass demonstration in favor of independence. The sun features are those of Inti, the Inca god of the sun.

National Symbols Of Argentina

National Crest

Photo dreamstime
Photo dreamstime

This crest was officially declared to be a national symbol in March 1813. It can be depicted by the meaning of the different elements that construct it, like the light blue and white background suggesting the national flag. The image of the two hands shaking symbolizes the union between the provinces to become one country. The red hat is called “gorro frigio” and it symbolizes liberty, equality and sacrifice. The reason the hands are holding it up is to represent that the people are committed to these values. The laurel branches at the sides stand for victory and glory, and lastly, the sun on top is a newborn sun, as a symbol of truth and prosperity.

Escarapelas

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Photo Pinterest

An “escarapela” is a little piece of ribbon that one attaches to one’s clothes with a pin during national holidays.

Our escarapela was born on 25th May, 1810, when a couple of citizens, ordered by Domingo French and Juan Manuel Beruti, stood in Plaza de Mayo and gave out these blue/light blue and white and red ribbons to the rebels to wear in order to show unity and organization. In 1812, the escarapela was declared to be a national symbol and that these were to be bicolor, light blue and white; not red anymore because that was the color that represented Spain and the conservative party.

Nowadays, it is common to see people with one of these escarapelas pinned to their clothing during the Semana de Mayo (18th to the 25th of that month), our Independence Day on 9th July and our flag day on 20th June.

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